Where Chief Runs With Paws Rules the Land

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In the new America, this Land of The Free where so many of The Brave fear their own shadow, where vandals are lauded for destruction of historical monuments, and riots and resistance on college campuses is praised because The First Amendment is too provocative, my understanding fails me when Chief Runs With Paws scampers by unnoticed.

In case you’re wondering, Runs With Paws is the latest cat figurine from Illinois-based, online retailer The Hamilton Collection.20170829_122737

“Wearing his majestic ceremonial headdress with pride and casting an all-knowing, green-eyed stare your way, this adorable kitty is the chosen guardian of the spirit world.”

And now, he can be all yours with the Chief Runs with Paws Figurine, “a Native American-inspired cat figurine available in a limited edition…. This little kitty is ready to bring his indomitable spirit to your home.”

You’d think the Native American has endured more than any other race in the country, having been ridiculed and enslaved for centuries. Afterall, they’re essentially still enslaved in the concentration camps we call reservations despite their ability to live freely among their captors.

Yes, they’re arguably free to judicate the enclosures they were given, the enclosures we’ve all (White, Black, Yellow, or Brown) given them or forcibly led them to—with exception to when our Government decides to supercede them with a pipeline, and when Leftist organizations like Greenpeace exploits their cause.

Speaking of exploitation, Chief Runs With Paw’s “all-knowing, green-eyed stare” will continue to watch you while Margaret Sanger is celebrated in the National Portrait Gallery for her role in the eugenics movement, for her speech to the Ku Klux Klan, and as founder of Planned Parenthood; while former Ku Klux Klan leader and U.S. Senator Robert Byrd (D-W. Va.) is lauded as a mentor because he said, “I’m sorry I supported supremacy and segregation,” and yet has more than 50 public buildings named in his honor; and while General Robert E. Lee—who openly scorned secession, war and even opposed memorializing the events of the Civil War—is systematically removed from our peripheral view in a sweeping attempt at cultural genocide.

(Read: Confederate Statues Removed While Racist Progressive Statues Remain)

But Chief Runs With Paws marches on, quietly obtaining pats on his feathered war bonnet. As he trots, the society who pets him remains more concerned with tightening an elusive, invisible strand of shackles in spite of themselves, avoiding historical fact while placing greater concern on someone who’s a little too pink to represent fictional characters in movies and television.

Meanwhile, back on the reservation someone wonders why a new Walmart just covered their ancestral home, and Chief Runs With Paws rules the land

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International Mommas: The Women I Know

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While a surge of females are hashtagging themselves into the history books for A Day Without A Woman (#ADayWithoutAWoman) on International Women’s Day (#InternationalWomensDay) I celebrate those who stand strong in the shadows.

Everyday, I’m thankful for my momma and all of the strong, Appalachian women who came before her or stand beside her; the women who guided me and, together with my dad and grandfather, helped me become the man I am today.

I’ve never known the women of the wage gap, those who feel unequal or unheard, the bra burners, the disenfranchised, the devalued, the Middle Eastern and Third World voices who are never heard behind the veil; who can’t vote, drive, dance, or be a woman.

The only women I’ve known were stronger than most men, and they don’t or never would have put up with misogyny.

The women I know have a gentle spirit with hands that know how to hold on and love with all their heart, or smack and grab to make you mind.

The women I know? They know how to mend your cuts, tend your bruises, till the soil, lead the people and win their run for office, love their God, respect their family, shoot a pistol, ride a horse, instruct a classroom, mend a shirt, cook a mean pot of chicken and dumplings, and do most any job a man can do. … And they know it.

The women I know have always known it.

Knowing the women I know fills me with pride. It also makes me sad for women marching today; those who live lives so devalued, who feel so degraded either among themselves or their peers, that they believe it takes more than one voice to be heard and more than one body to be seen.

Trust me, if you see my momma coming at you with purpose, you don’t need a mob to tell the world we need strong women.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve always known the women of the world are the glue that holds us all together.

Not only did my momma show me so, but The Bible does a fine job telling me, too. From my point of view, you could argue its finer points depending on your religion or lack thereof, but Proverbs says, “Honor her for all that her hands have done, and let her works bring her praise at the city gate.”

That’s where I stand and this is my honor, to my momma and the women like her—the real feminists—whom I choose to praise today and always, because it’s difficult to show the world how valuable you are by taking a day off.